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Our oral surgeon and team at Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery of Fairfield County know that many people have questions about their oral surgery care. We have provided answers to some of the questions that we hear most often below. If you have any other questions, we invite you to call us at 203-489-0980 to schedule an appointment with Dr. Imanuel Babayev at our friendly dental office in Norwalk, Connecticut.
 

printable FAQS:

 

 


 

ANESTHESIA

 

  1. CAN I BE ASLEEP FOR MY SURGERY?
    Yes, as long as there is no medical condition that would make it unsafe. If you are anxious or apprehensive about the surgery, we have the capability to make sure you are asleep, comfortable and don’t recall any part of the surgery.You will likely not remember the Novocaine shot,sounds of the instruments, or pressure from the procedure. If you have had a previous bad experience or would prefer to not remember any of the surgery, you will find this option very appealing.
  2. IS IT SAFE TO BE ASLEEP? AM I GOING TO WAKE UP?
    Our anesthesia technique does not include any intubation or paralysis, which is routine for hospital surgeries. Therefore, our risk of major complications is very low (-1 in 70,000) and our practice’s track record of major complications from anesthesia is flawless. Furthermore, the numbing medicine is given after you are asleep. That means that we control the dosage of IV medication and the chance of overdosing is dramatically reduced. The general anesthesia is administered by our fully trained doctors up to 10 times per day, five days per week. Our equipment is new and up-to-date and we are completely prepared for any and all emergencies. Our doctors and our entire surgical team have been extensively trained to handle any emergency situation, should it arise. Since our inception in 2003, our office has never had a major complication associated with the anesthesia.
  3. WILL I REMEMBER ANY PART OF THE SURGERY?
    If you are young, healthy and have no history of medical problems, there is a greater than 95% chance that you will remember nothing from the surgery. Many people do not remember going home. However, there is a small percentage of people who have a very high tolerance to medication, either due to genetic predisposition or previous history of substance abuse, or who have difficult airway management issues (for example, severe sleep apnea). lf you are in this group of patients, there is a small chance that you will remember some talking or conversation towards the end of surgery. This will not be a traumatic or painful memory, since you will be numb and will not be feeling any discomfort. Although our priority is your comfort, our ultimate goal is your safety.
  4. WILL I NEED AN IV?
    Yes.The IV is the method we use to give the medication to help you fall asleep. By the time you arrive, you will be very relaxed from the premedication.To minimize any discomfort, we apply a freezing topical anesthetic along with the laughing gas.The IV is a small,child-size catheter; so it is much less traumatic than a conventional emergency room IV. For most of our patients, the IV is not stressful.
  5. WHY CAN’T I HAVE GAS TO FALL ASLEEP?
    Falling asleep by way of inhaling anesthetic gases is permitted in the operating room setting when IV access is difficult (for example, with small children or with people who have extremely small and difficult veins).The risk of complications is higher for this type of anesthesia and should be reserved for the hospital operating room setting.
  6. WHAT ARE THE SIDE EFFECTS OF THE ANESTHESIA?
    With our method of anesthesia, the chance of undesirable side effects is greatly reduced. There is always a risk of nausea and vomiting from any anesthesia. Since the total amount of medication is less than for a conventional hospital anesthesia, the probability of this side effect is significantly lessened. Also, there is a small percentage of people who become emotional or combative when waking up from the anesthesia.They are not crying because they are hurting; rather, it is a side effect of the medication. Most of the time these patients do not remember their reactions, but it can be difficult for loved ones to witness. It is only temporary for a few hours after the surgery and there are no long-term effects.
  7. ARE THERE ANY CONTRAINDICATIONS TO THE GENERAL ANESTHESIA IN THE OFFICE?
    Our age limit is approximately 6 years of age. Patients younger than 5 will be treated with the help of the anesthesia team at the hospital or a mobile anesthesiologist at our office.
  8. IS THERE AN ANESTHESIOLOGIST PRESENT AT THE SURGERY?
    All of our doctors have had a MINIMUM of 9-12 months of direct patient care with the medical anesthesiology department at their respective institutions.They are extremely well qualified, experts in the field, for the type of anesthesia we administer. Many of our doctors have had additional extensive training in the field of anesthesiology.Therefore, for the type of anesthetic we use, a separate anesthesiologist is not needed.

 

 

WISDOM TEETH

 

  1. WHEN IS THE BEST TIME TO HAVE MY WISDOM TEETH REMOVED?
    Early, preferably during your teenage years. There is an enormous advantage in removing your wisdom teeth before the roots have had a chance to grow. Your recovery is much quicker, the surgery is technically easier, and the risk of complications is much lower.
  2. MY WISDOM TEETH AREN’T BOTHERING ME. WHY SHOULD I HAVE THEM REMOVED?
    Your wisdom teeth are not useful teeth. They do not aid in chewing or function. However, they are located in the very back of your jaw, where it is difficult for your toothbrush or floss to reach. This difficulty in hygiene makes the teeth much more susceptible to cavities and infection. When wisdom teeth are removed at a later age, the surgery becomes more difficult and the recovery time is prolonged. We do not believe that if wisdom teeth come in straight and don’t bother you, they do not need to be removed. We believe they should be removed as early as possible.
  3. HOW LONG IS THE RECOVERY?
    Everyone heals differently. Generally, when the wisdom teeth are removed during the teenage years, recovery is usually less than a week. However, when the roots are fully formed with a solid foundation to the jawbone, the recovery is much longer. A broad estimate for recovery time is less than a week if under 20 years old; 1-2 weeks for patients in their early to mid-twenties; and more than 2 weeks for patients older than their late twenties or thirties.
  4. WHAT TYPE OF PAIN MEDICINE WILL I NEED?
    We recommend two types of medicines following the surgery. The first medicine is prescription strength ibuprofen, which will provide baseline pain relief without the side effects of the stronger narcotics. The second medicine is a strong narcotic, either Vicodin or Percocet. These medicines have many undesirable side effects, and therefore should only be used for breakthrough episodes of discomfort.
  5. CAN I BE ASLEEP FOR THE SURGERY?
    Yes, and this option is highly recommended, as long as there is no medical condition that would make it unsafe. If you are anxious or apprehensive about the surgery, we have the capability to make sure you are asleep, comfortable, and that you don’t recall any part of the surgery. You will likely not remember the Novocaine shot, sounds of the instruments, or pressure from the procedure. If you have had a previous bad experience, or would prefer to not remember any of the surgery, you will find this option appealing.
  6. HOW MANY WISDOM TEETH CAN I REMOVE AT ONE TIME?
    It depends on the difficulty of the procedure. When removing wisdom teeth in younger patients, we generally recommend removing all four at the same time while the patient is asleep. However, at more advanced ages, when there is potential for increased difficulty, we sometimes recommend treating one side of the mouth at a time. For example, the upper and lower wisdom teeth on the right side would be removed first, followed by the removal of the upper and lower wisdom teeth on the left side after the right side has fully healed.

 

DENTAL IMPLANTS

 

  1. HOW MUCH DOES AN IMPLANT COST?
    With the large number of cases performed by our surgeons, we are able to offer implants at costs that are comparable to the cost of dental bridges. At your consultation, we will provide a written estimate of your treatment after your clinical examination and determination of the extent of your procedure. Please remember that this does not include the abutment and crown that your dentist will be placing.

  2. CAN THE IMPLANT BE PLACED AT THE TIME OF EXTRACTION?
    Sometimes. The two factors that determine if this is possible are (1) anatomy and (2) amount of available bone. Once all presurgical planning is completed, your surgeon will let you know if you are a candidate for this option.
  3. DO IMPLANTS WORK? IS THERE A GUARANTEE THAT THEY WORK?
    As with any surgery, we cannot guarantee unconditional success. All implants are foreign bodies. Therefore, there is always a chance for failure. There have been incredible technological advances in the field of dental implantology in the last ten years. Better materials, surface treatments and implant designs have dramatically improved the success rates. In the 1980’s dental implants were given survival rates as low as 60%. Currently, the standard of care is over 90%. In our experience of performing over thousands of implants, failure rate is 1 in 20 (5%). If a failure occurs, the implants are fully guaranteed and will be replaced at no cost to you.
  4. WHAT ARE THE POTENTIAL COMPLICATIONS?
    For implants in the lower jaw, there is the risk of lip and chin numbness. For implants in the upper jaw, there is the risk of exposure into the sinus. Our surgeons have the experience and capabilities of high tech diagnostic planning to dramatically decrease the risk of these complications.
  5. WHAT TYPE OF ANESTHESIA IS USED?
    If you have moderate to severe anxiety for any dental procedure, we offer the option of being asleep for the procedure. It is a very safe, pleasant and stress-free form of anesthesia that is recommended for implant surgery, but not required. The other option is to numb the area with “Novocaine”, much like a regular visit at the dentist.
  6. DO IMPLANTS NEED SPECIAL CARE?
    No special care is needed, but they do need to be brushed and flossed regularly and professionally maintained with regular visits to your dentist.
  7. ARE YOU A CANDIDATE FOR IMPLANTS?
    Very few patients are poor implant candidates, and when they are, it is due to unfavorable anatomy. Most people can have missing teeth replaced with implants, but some will require bone and soft tissue grafting prior to the implants to achieve optimum results. Your surgeon should be able to predictably determine your prognosis and risks at your consultation visit.
  8. IF I’M HAVING A FRONT TOOTH REPLACED WITH AN IMPLANT, WILL I HAVE TO BE TOOTHLESS DURING THE HEALING PERIOD?
    No. If you are replacing a front tooth with an implant, there will be some form of temporary, removable replacement while the implant heals. This healing period can take up to 4 – 6 months, but during that time, your dentist will fabricate a device that will replace the missing tooth with a temporary partial denture, retainer or splint. This device will be placed at the time of implant surgery.